The Lonergan Reader
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U of T Press

LWS Front Page


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each of the eight functional specialties is discussed separately. In making selections from this more specialized second half of Method in Theology, our aim is primarily to represent the foundations Lonergan proposes for the guidance of a methodical theology.

Part 4 consists of selections from works produced after the completion of Method in Theology in 1971. They are representative of Lonergan's deepening methodological reflections on issues bearing directly upon creative and healing intervention in the course of human affairs. These reflections followed his public proposal for a renovation of theological practice.

For each selection we have provided a brief introduction which is meant to give the reader a foretaste of the contents. For Parts 1 and 3, each of which consists of selections from a single work, we have also provided general introductions. At the end of each selection, whenever appropriate, we have appended a list of related selections for the reader who wishes to pursue specific ideas.

All references to Lonergan's works and to the works of others in these selections which are not enclosed in square brackets are Lonergan's own. When reference is made by Lonergan to a portion of his works which is wholly or partly contained in this volume, we have indicated its location in square brackets, e.g., [1.V.2-5 in this reader], indicating Part 1, Selection V, sections 2-5 in this volume.

We wish to express our appreciation and gratitude to the many Lonergan scholars who responded so thoroughly and helpfully to a questionnaire we distributed when The Lonergan Reader was at an early stage of planning. We regret that we have not been able to incorporate all of the recommended selections into the final product. But it is our hope and expectation that this volume will prove sufficient for their needs. We are also grateful to F.E. Crowe, R.M. Doran, and R.C. Croken of the Lonergan Research Institute for their expert advice and friendly cooperation. We wish to acknowledge Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, which provided grant support for the early stages of this project. Finally, we wish to thank the editors and readers of the University of Toronto Press for their indispensable guidance and assistance.

[End of Introduction]