The Lonergan Reader
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that he persevered in his religious vocation. The next four years at Guelph were spent in strictly regulated spiritual training and studying the classics in Greek and Latin, mathematics, English, French, and elocution, which entailed writing and delivering sermons in Latin and Greek.

The normal course of Jesuit training included the novitiate and juniorate years, followed by formal study of philosophy, a period of spiritual formation and work called 'regency,' and then formal study of theology. Lonergan followed the normal course. In 1926, his novitiate and juniorate completed, Lonergan was sent to study philosophy at Heythrop College, Oxford, which had just been founded for the Jesuits of England. Lonergan described the state of philosophy there as predominantly Suarezian. All of the textbooks were of German origin. He was to remark that he had to unlearn this type of philosophical training. It was during his time at Heythrop that Lonergan predicted that 'the theory of knowledge is what is going to interest me most of all.'(7) During this time, too, he developed a strong interest in John Henry Newman's Grammar of Assent: 'I was looking for someone who had some common sense, and knew what he was talking about. And what was Newman talking about? About judgment as assent; and real apprehension and notional apprehension, notional assent and real assent. He was answering the liberal view that all judgments are more or less probable but nothing is certain. And he could give examples.'(8) While at Heythrop he wrote essays for the student journal, the Blandyke Papers, which reflected his early interest in cognitional theory. These included 'The Form of Mathematical Inference,' 'The Syllogism,' and 'True Judgment and Science.' But Lonergan did not concentrate solely on philosophy. He also pursued a degree at the University of London - in 1930 he was awarded a BA in Greek, Latin, French, and mathematics - and he developed a special fondness for the writings of Lewis Carroll and G.K. Chesterton.

For his regency Lonergan was sent to Loyola College, Montreal, where he taught from 1930 to 1933. He apparently experienced a crisis in his religious vocation at this time owing to a number of strains, in particular the imposition by his superior of an extra year of teaching duty: 'I had regarded myself as one condemned to sacrifice his real To Page 6


7. Cited by F.E. Crowe in Lonergan (Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1972), 14.

8. Caring, 14; see also 46.