The Lonergan Reader
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week-long institute on Method in Theology at Milltown Park, Dublin, in the summer of 1971, and lectures on this new work at the University of San Francisco in 1972.

In 1975, Lonergan moved from Regis to Boston College, where he was Visiting Distinguished Professor of Theology until 1983. He continued to expand on ideas he had developed in Insight and Method in Theology. He wrote on the historico-religious triad of progress, decline rooted in bias, and recovery, and on the need for both healing and creating in history. Lonergan's central interest during this period was to continue his work in economics. As he wrote in 'Healing and Creating in History,' 'When the system that is needed for our collective survival does not exist, then it is futile to excoriate what does exist while blissfully ignoring the task of constructing a technically viable economic system that can be put in its place.'(19) While at Boston College he developed and taught a course entitled 'Macro-economics and the Dialectic of History.' In 1983 he became ill and was unable to teach. He retired to the Jesuit infirmary in Pickering, Ontario, where he welcomed friends and students for brief discussions. Bernard Lonergan died on November 26, 1984.

Lonergan had written to his Jesuit superior in 1935, 'I know more luminously than anything else that I have nothing I have not received.'(20) This early remark clearly reveals a humility that was to characterize Lonergan for the rest of his life. But this genuine humility did not stop many people and organizations from recognizing the significance of his accomplishments. Lonergan was made Companion of the Order of Canada in 1970; the Catholic Theological Society of America presented him with the John Courtney Murray Award in 1972; he was made a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy in 1975; and he was awarded nineteen honorary doctorates.(21) He was honored with a Festschrift on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday and by a symposium at Marquette University on the occasion of his seventy-fifth. Finally, two international congresses dedicated to the exploration of his thought have been held, at Saint Leo College in Florida in 1970 and at Santa Clara University in 1984.

This sketch provides the reader with a general idea of Lonergan's To Page 10


19. Lonergan, A Third Collection, 108.

20. Cited by Crowe in Lonergan, 5.

21. Richard M. Liddy, Transforming the Light: Intellectual Conversion in the Early Lonergan, (Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1993), 211-12.